St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor, on The Natural Law

Standard

St. Thomas Aquinas.1.Wikiped

January 28th is the Memorial of St. Thomas Aquinas, priest and Doctor of the Church.  Known as the Angelic Doctor, he wrote the Summa Theologiae as well as Adoro te devote, O salutaris, Tantum ergo, and Pange lingua. Arguably the greatest philosopher of all time and unarguably one of the greatest (even among agnostic and athiests).

The daily prescription, a quotation from St. Thomas’ Tretise on Law.” and taken from the Catechism of the Catholic Church #1955.

“The natural law is nothing other than the light of understanding placed in us by God; through it we know what we must do and what must be avoided. God has given this light or law at the creation.”

So if we examine our consciences daily, practicing our “logic muscle” in light of our actions, we can, according to St. Thomas come to better understand what we must do and what we must not do (and in turn, know right from wrong.)

Peace,

Deacon Tom Gotschall, The Deacon Dad at:

http://tomgotschall.wordpress.com/

https://doctorsofthechurch.wordpress.com/

Deacon Tom Gotschall on YouTube.

Advertisements

St. Hilary of Poitiers, Doctor, on Baptism

Standard

St_HilaryofPoitiers..1jpg

St. Hilary of Poitiers, who’s memorial we celebrate on January 13, was, like St. Athanasius, a great defender of the belief that Jesus Christ is “true God and true man”, particularly against the Arian heretics in the 4th century.  In the quote from St. Hilary below, we see a developed understanding explained that, by our baptism, we have a blessed relationship with God.

“Everything that happened to Christ lets us know that, after the bath of water, the Holy Spirit swoops down upon us from high heaven and that, adopted by the Father’s voice, we become sons of God.” In Matth. 2, 5: PL 9,927.

It screams “OPPORTUNITY!”

So here’s the question for you:

  • Do you live in such a way that our Heavenly Father can say about you, “This is my son (my daughter), in whom I am well-pleased.”?

Peace,

Deacon Tom Gotschall, The Deacon Dad at:

http://tomgotschall.wordpress.com/

https://doctorsofthechurch.wordpress.com/

Deacon Tom Gotschall on YouTube.

St. Hildegard, Doctor

Standard

St. Hildegard of Bingen.1.Wikip

St. Hildegard was a multi-talented woman. Named a Doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XVI on October 7, 2012, she is not well known however we suspect her following will continue to grow as the faithful get to know her. She adds to the body of knowledge and understanding of our Faith.  As we prepare for Sunday Mass, let’s consider her words concerning the power of music and worship as our “prescription of the day.”

“The words symbolize the body, and the jubilant music indicates the spirit; and the celestial harmony shows the
divinity, and the words the humanity of the Son of God.”

Gregorian Chant.1

Peace,

Deacon Tom Gotschall, The Deacon Dad at:

http://tomgotschall.wordpress.com/

https://doctorsofthechurch.wordpress.com/

Deacon Tom Gotschall on YouTube.

St. Basil the Great, Doctor, on Virtue

Standard

St. Basil the Great.2

St. Basil the Great, who’s feast we’ll celebrate on January 2, is the son of a saint (St. Basil, the Elder), the brother of two saints (St. Gregory of Nyssa and St. Peter of Sebaste) and one of his best friends is a saint and also Doctor of the ChurchSt. Gregory Nazianzen.) St. Basil the Great defended the faith against the Arian Heresy (which denied the divinity of Jesus Christ.)  He also preached on the Psalms.

Today’s prescription is a snippet of a homily by St.Basil the Great on Psalm 1

“…the exercise of piety is rather like a ladder, that ladder which once was seen by Blessed Jacob, of which one end was near the earth and reached to the ground, while the other end extended above and reached to heaven itself.

What is necessary is that those who are being introduced to the virtuous life should put their feet on the first steps and from there mount ever to the next, until at last they have ascended by degrees to such heights as are attainable by human nature.”

  • Is taking that first, or next step in virtue a difficulty?  If so, what is it that makes growth in virtue difficult?
  • Change toward virtue is often very difficult and may mean changing friends. for the head of a family, however, much humility and patience may be the virtues prayed for the most so as to allow for growth in overall holiness.
  • Moving a whole family toward holiness might seem, for quite some time, like turning a great ship 180 degrees

St. Basil the Great, pray for us.

Peace,

Deacon Tom Gotschall, The Deacon Dad at:

http://tomgotschall.wordpress.com/

https://doctorsofthechurch.wordpress.com/

Deacon Tom Gotschall on YouTube.

St. Peter Canisius, Doctor, on Compassion

Standard

st__peter_canisius..1jpg

Prescription of the Day (a two-for-one thought provoker)

“Is it not inexcusable that there should be so many people in rags while our clothes chests are stuffed with abundance of garments?”

AND

“And what defense can there be for women who are never done aquiring jewels and aids to beauty, who are always thinking of something new in hopes of outshining rivals.”

St. Peter Canisius, who’s memorial we’ll celebrate on December 21st is known as the Doctor of the Catechism.  He whote very catechetically and taught against those revolting from the Church in the 16th century.  Like so many of the wonderful saints, this Doctor of the Church teaches compassionately about the poor.

So ask yourself:

  • Am I sharing or hoarding?
  • What should I share?
  • How much should I share?
  • How can I take the first step?  Share your experiences in taking the first step in sharing.

Peace,

Deacon Tom Gotschall, The Deacon Dad at:

http://tomgotschall.wordpress.com/

https://doctorsofthechurch.wordpress.com/

St. John of the Cross, Doctor, on Particular Judgment

Standard

John of the Cross.2

Prescription of the Day

“At the evening of life, we shall be judged on our love.”

Recalling what St. Paul wrote to the Corinthians, “There are in the end three things that last; faith, hope and love, and the greatest of these is love.” 1 Cor 13:13.

The good news is that we have the opportunity to examine our lives daily against this simple concept.  Ask yourself:

  • Has my love increased today?
  • If not, why not?
  • How can I be judged more favorably in accord with love?

And pray for more love…

St. John of the Cross, pray for us!

Peace,

Deacon Tom Gotschall, The Deacon Dad at

http://tomgotschall.wordpress.com/

https://doctorsofthechurch.wordpress.com/